An Introduction to Influencer Marketing Guide

With so many social media platforms, one surefire way to expand your online presence is influencer marketing. 

There is no one-size-fits-all approach to influencer marketing, but you could make it work for your business with proper research and planning.

What is Influencer Marketing?

When an influential person known as an influencer collaborates with a business to promote their products or services, it is known as influencer marketing. 

In the past, brands only had celebrity endorsements. But in the digital age we live in, online content creators with dedicated and engaged groups of followers have changed the game of influencer marketing.

It is common to find yourself asking, “Does influencer marketing bring any positive results?”. Well, Civic Science reported that 14% of 18 to 24-year-olds and 11% of millennials in the U.S had bought some products or services in the last six months because an influencer recommended it. 

When it comes to influencer marketing campaigns on social media platforms, Instagram currently tops the list, but it seems like TikTok is catching up. With 68% of U.S marketers planning to use TikTok for influencer campaigns, it is becoming as popular as Facebook to be the preferred platform. 

Types of Social Media Influencers

When we say social media influencers, usually celebrities come to your mind. As we said earlier, while celebrities are the top influencers, not all influencers are celebrities. 

On the contrary, influencers with a niche follower base could be more effective for brands as they have a higher engagement rate than celebrities. Plus, it won’t burn a hole in your pockets. 

Usually, influencers are grouped based on their audience size. Let’s look at different types of influencers.

Nano-influencers

These are the ones who have just started out and have less than 10,000 followers

While their reach is low, their influence on their small, tight-knit community is enormous. Nano-influencers may know most of their followers on some level. 

It could be beneficial for a brand because we are more likely to buy a product on family or friends’ recommendation than some celebrity. Nano-influencers bring a sense of relatability and trust that is rarely seen with celebrity influencers. 

Micro-influencers

The most common influencers you will find are micro-influencers who have between 10,000 and 100,000 followers

Micro-influencers are more specialised and have a more engaged audience than their bigger counterparts, thus bringing in more qualified leads for your business.

Macro-influencers

With followers between 100,000 to 1 million, macro-influencers have a celebrity status of their own.

Since macro-influencers have grown their follower base from scratch, they know their audience well. The strong connection with the audience makes macro-influencers a preferred choice for brands with more major marketing campaigns. 

Mega-influencers

With more than 1 million followers, mega-influencers have a following outside the social media world. They are usually celebrities, actors, singers or internet personalities who have risen to fame recently. 

However, mega-influencers don’t have a personal connection to their followers, so they could be considered less trustworthy. 

Tips for Creating an Influencer Marketing Strategy

Know Your Audience

The first step is to define who your audience is for your campaign. To make your strategy effective, you need to target the right people. 

So how do you know who the right people are? Through buyer personas

Developing your buyer personas is a great way to know your audience. Defining your audience helps you understand the kind of influencers you should collaborate with.

Establish Your Goals

For marketers, the number one goal of influencer marketing is to reach a new audience. Your brand visibility increases when your products or services reach the influencers’ followers. 

Usually, the top goal for brands is to reach potential customers, while bringing an actual sale is lower on the list. It is essential to create measurable goals that you can track. 

Shortlist Influencers

Trust is the most significant factor when it comes to choosing influencers. If your audience doesn’t trust or respect this person’s opinions, you will find yourself scrambling to get tangible results. 

One way of finding out if your potential influencer is trusted is through their engagement. You should check if their posts have plenty of views, comments, likes and shares. 

When an influencer has a reasonable engagement rate, they have a loyal following. So check if their follower count is inflated through bots or fake accounts. 

Do Your Research

Now that you’ve compiled a list of influencers you would like to work with, the next step is to find out how often they share sponsored content. 

Check how they are keeping their audiences engaged – do they post a lot of organic, non-sponsored content, or is there a ton of paid posts on their page? Posting paid content often affects the engagement rate. 

Before you approach an influencer, make sure you do your homework. Know what channels they post, their audience, the frequency of sponsored content. 

Track Results

It is pretty normal to get impressed by the sheer number of likes and comments on the influencers’ posts. But to measure the campaign results, you must figure out its return on investment. 

One of the most effective ways to measure results is UTM parameters. Prepare unique links with UTM codes for each influencer. This way, you can know how many sales you made through an influencer and get a clear idea of how your campaign is performing. 

Don’t forget to request your influencers to send you insights and detailed reports on their posts’ reach and engagement levels. 

So there you go, a starter guide to help you start working on your influencer marketing strategy. If you find the right approach, you will soon be inundated with many new customers and sales. 


Do you want marketing services? GoViral Digital has a whole decade of experience specialising in inbound marketing, and we are taking clients for 2022. Request a proposal to help you improve your business.


Content Strategies for Different Stages of the Buyer Journey

What is a Buyer Journey?

We usually don’t make purchases on a whim, and instead, there is a whole process of research and consideration before anyone shells out those bucks. So in simple terms, a buyer journey is your buyer’s path to purchase

Buyer Journey gives marketers an insight into the pains and problems experienced by their customers and the influencing factors that push them to make a decision. It allows you to better empathise with the buyer and position your products or services along the process. 

With the aftermath of the pandemic, around 57% of the buyer journey happens without any human interaction even taking place. So how do you engage your buyers without actively interacting with them? 

Content strategy is your answer. It is essential to prepare a content strategy for each stage as it will be easier for you to motivate the buyer to make a purchase when they hit the human interaction part of their journey. 

Let’s dig in a little further to understand better the different stages of a Buyer Journey and the types of content for each stage. 

There are five stages to a Buyer Journey:

Awareness Stage

Example: “I am thirsty.”

This stage is where the buyer realises that they have a problem. They don’t know how to meet or solve the problem yet. Their goal is to alleviate the pain, but this is only an information-gathering step. 

They are looking to get a better idea and give a name to their problem. They are not ready to make any decision. 

Your content strategy should focus on the pain and problems of your buyers and provide them with big-picture industry-focus resources that can help them define their problems. Your best choice is press releases, social media promotions, or advertorial content that leads them to the next stage.

Questions to ask yourself:

  • What is the priority of the challenges for buyers? 
  • How do buyers talk about their goals or challenges?
  • Are there any misconceptions buyers have about addressing their problems? If so, what are they?
  • What are the consequences of buyers’ inaction? 

Research Stage

Example: “Where can I find some drink?”

Once buyers have a little understanding of their problem, they get interested in finding a solution. They start discovering products, brands, and trends. 

The goal of your content plan is to educate and help buyers evaluate buying criteria. Usually, buyers trust videos, webinars, events, or ebooks in the research stage.

Questions to ask yourself:

  • How do buyers educate themselves on these goals and challenges?
  • What are the symptoms that bring their attention to the problem?
  • What will help them identify the problem and push them to your products or services designed to help them?
  • What online or offline sources do they find reliable?

Consideration stage

Example: “The vending machine has water, soda and juice. What should I buy?”

Now that your buyers have clearly defined the problem and are committed to solving it, the next step is to guide them through different approaches or methods available to them. Your content strategy should help them make a decision

While case studies or data sheets can prove helpful in this stage, offering demos or leading them to trusted reviews will motivate buyers to solve their challenges. 

Questions to ask yourself:

  • What are the different categories of solutions available to the buyers?
  • In what way do buyers educate themselves on the various categories?
  • Are there any pros and cons for each category? If so, how do buyers perceive them? 
  • What factors influence the buyers’ decision for the right solution for their needs?

Purchase Stage

Example: “I will buy a soda.”

When your buyers reach this stage, they are ready to make the final decision and has a solid reason for their choice. They have already decided on the solution and evaluated providers. As a marketer, you should focus on learning if they have any objections before making the purchase. 

Your content should not only validate their decision but also make the purchase process easy. You need to cater to their every question and provide the best service to them. This stage could be where your buyer makes his first human contact with your business. 

Your sales approach must highlight a unique selling proposition that provides value and set you apart from the rest. While they are talking to sales, your content strategy offers support to keep their attention. Engage them in live training, demos, user guides or kick-off events

Questions to ask yourself:

  • What do buyers know about your products and services? 
  • What do they like about your products and services compared to your competitors? 
  • Do they have any concerns?
  • Do buyers want to test the products or services before making a purchase? 
  • Do buyers need any additional information, such as user guides or manuals? 

Post-Purchase

Example: “The soda is flat. I should have got water.”

Excellent customer service leads to brand loyalty. In this stage, your buyers expect an exceptional product or service performance and excellent customer service. Play your cards right, and you get a loyal customer base. Who knows, they could turn into an advocate for your brand. After all, word-of-mouth is one of the only forms of marketing that comes from your buyers. 

To keep them coming back, offer loyalty programs, build customer communities (online and offline), send newsletters, or even check in through phone calls. The goal is to make them feel cared for. 

Questions to ask yourself:

  • How are buyers expecting to receive post-purchase support and guidance?
  • What obstacles could buyers face in your products or services?
  • What are buyers’ expectations of your products or services?
  • What actions do buyers need to take to achieve the best result?
  • How do buyers rate your product or service, its value, and their satisfaction?

So there you have it – The buyer Journey and all its stages. 

Before you jump on creating your buyer journey, make sure you know your buyer personas. Be sure to read our article, “The Importance of Buyer Personas“. 

Don’t forget that the primary goal of Buyer Journey is to build a more customer-centric strategy to meet the needs of your target audience. 


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What’s better for your business: Facebook or LinkedIn?

As a marketer, choosing which social media channel to focus on is always a puzzle. Many are left scrambling their heads with a multitude of doubts like “Where do I start?”, “Which platform gives me the best ROI on my efforts?” or “Is one platform better than the other?”

 

While asking questions about different platforms is normal, it isn’t smart to gamble your way out. The key to a successful marketing campaign is identifying your target audience and your marketing goals.

Among dozens of social media platforms, Facebook and LinkedIn are popular choices with marketers. Let’s break down what works best for your business. 

 

LinkedIn is a professional network that was initially founded as a recruitment platform. Over the years, it developed to mimic many features similar to other social networking sites. For example, you can share status updates, send private messages, and connect with people. 

 

On the other hand, Facebook was intended to be a platform for people to share and communicate. However, you can now find plenty of new features that let businesses reach their target audience. One survey by the company found that 74% of American consumers use Facebook to discover new products and brands.

 

So what are the differences between the two platforms?

Statistics

When it comes to numbers, Facebook is the clear winner. 

 

There are 2.8 billion monthly active users worldwide on Facebook, while LinkedIn’s number stands at 64.7 million

 

According to reports, the most active age group on both platforms is 25 to 34-year-olds. However, due to its popularity, Facebook has a broader range of users. 10% of Facebook users are under 18 or over 64. The reason behind this is that Facebook is for everyday users, but LinkedIn caters mainly to professionals.

B2B or B2C?

Undoubtedly, LinkedIn is a more robust B2B platform. Since the platform was designed for networking, it is a go-to place for business-driven individuals. Which also makes it easy to identify key decision-makers and target them directly.

Social selling is embedded into the platform. Reports suggest that LinkedIn has the largest share of B2B display ad spending. 

 

While Facebook can be B2B, it is recognised more as a B2C platform. If you want to reach consumers directly, Facebook is the preferred choice. Not only it is a perfect place to generate brand awareness and engagement, but it also provides you 10X more prospects. 

 

According to reports, marketers see the highest return on investment on Facebook. The networking site wins in numbers hands down, but LinkedIn generates tangible leads. 

Thought Leadership

When it comes to thought leadership, LinkedIn beats Facebook relatively easy. The platform promotes business conversations, and one of the ways brands gain credibility and visibility organically is by thought leadership.

Through thought leadership articles, brands can educate, prompt conversations, and push to action. These programs increase website traffic and subscribers, thus helping with lead generation and brand awareness. 

 

Marketers see more success with thought leadership content on LinkedIn compared to Facebook.

LinkedIn Groups vs Facebook Groups

On both platforms, groups are where businesses can connect with prospects and other like-minded users. Before engaging in groups, marketers need to ask themselves –

 

“Which platform is my target audience mostly active on?”

 

Keep in mind that users engage on different platforms with different motives. On LinkedIn, conversations revolve around work-related topics, whereas on Facebook, users connect to share their personal opinions on various topics like food, lifestyles, hobbies, etc. 

 

Let’s look at an example. If you want to create awareness about your latest blender, targeting users in cooking groups on Facebook will get you the best results. 

 

However, LinkedIn is a better bet if you’re providing a high-priced service like personnel management.

Facebook Ads Vs. LinkedIn Ads

In terms of variety, Facebook and LinkedIn fair equally. Both platforms offer a diverse range of ads types like carousel, video, dynamic and lead ads

Targeting capabilities for ads on both sites rely on user input and content relevant to the information provided by them. So, you can easily target users based on basic information like job title, company, age, location, etc. However, Facebook also targets based on their life milestones, behaviour, and other personalized information. 

Who wins? Facebook or LinkedIn?

You decide!

Our verdict is that despite sharing standard features, Facebook and LinkedIn have different audiences and intentions. 

Which platform you want to use for marketing depends on your industry, target audience and goals. 

Another essential thing to remind every marketer is – you don’t have to choose. You can always select Facebook for user engagement and LinkedIn for targeted lead generation. 

All we can say is the winner lies in the eyes of the marketer!


Do you want professional guidance? GoViral has now a whole decade of experience specialising in inbound marketing and we can help you improve your business. Contact us to learn more! 


Can Inbound Marketing Help My Business?

How can you reach your audience in a digital world where consumers are sick of being sold to? Attract, convert, and delight your customers by incorporating an Inbound Marketing strategy for your business. 

 

Inbound marketing is a method that attracts potential customers to your brand through engaging content, while emphasising providing value and building trust, instead of just selling. This methodology isn’t anything new, but unfortunately not used enough in marketing. 

The foundation of inbound marketing are three phases: attract – engage – delight, which means inbound is not only about attracting the customers, but supporting and empowering them even after they become your customer. Inbound follows the long-term growth rule: ”good-for-the-customer means good-for-the-business!”

How can my business benefit from Inbound Marketing?

Inbound marketing is different from other marketing strategies since it has a goal beyond just attracting new customers or making a sale. The inbound methodology is designed to create long-lasting relationships that grow together with your business. Therefore, inbound marketing ensures that you are growing optimally and applies to businesses of any size. Regardless of whether you are a big corporation or a start-up, here are some benefits inbound marketing can bring you.

Build Authority and Brand Awareness

Utilising social media, creating quality blog posts, infographics and PPC (pay per click), are just some of the tools you can use as part of your inbound strategy to spread the word and raise awareness of your business. 

With inbound marketing, you can educate your prospects and change the perception that people have about your business by offering them something they need, and nurturing this relationship. And no, we don’t just mean a special discount to your e-shop. Use engaging content to share valuable information with your customers, and through time, it will result in more leads and sales. 

Your audience won’t even notice that you are leading them through the buyer journey, and will subconsciously put your brand in front of many others as you continue to nurture your relationship with them.

Reach New Markets and Audiences

Inbound is executed purely online, enabling marketers to reach diverse audiences whilst running a variety of different campaigns simultaneously. Aside from reaching new markets and audiences, inbound also allows you to specifically target people who are actively searching the internet for the products and services that you offer. One of the most effective examples is using PPC campaigns. 

PPC campaigns allow you to target users looking for keywords relevant to your business on search engines and social media channels. Although this seems like a simple strategy, it is proven to increase ROI (return on investment) and help deliver your content to your target audience.

Another way to reach new audiences is by targeting your content to relevant audiences using Facebook and Instagram ads. Check out this article for 5 things you should know when getting started with Facebook Ads Manager.

Cost-Effective Marketing

Naturally, when having a business, costs are an important factor that you always need to consider. For businesses of any size, inbound marketing is proven to be more cost-effective and generate more leads with less money than outbound marketing. Especially when it comes to start-ups or smaller companies, inbound marketing only requires a third of the price of traditional marketing costs to generate the same number of leads.

Create Long-Lasting Customer Relationships

One of the most important factors of inbound marketing is building long term relationships with your customers. In today’s digital world, inbound encourages you to provide support and the best possible experience for your customers. Using this innovative approach in your marketing strategy will help you keep your customers happy and nurture your relationship with them. 

In the end, what matters is having satisfied customers who would refer your business to their friends and family and eventually become ambassadors of your brand. Lastly, with little effort, inbound allows you to retain clients while attracting new customers, which is the key to a cost-effective marketing strategy.

Strengthen Sales and Marketing Alignment

Sales and marketing have a common goal – to generate revenue. However, in traditional marketing strategies, these two teams would usually work independently towards the same goal. Here’s where inbound methodology brings the two together by mapping a clear path from marketing and sales to align their efforts. 

Inbound empowers collaboration of these teams through every aspect of the buyer journey – marketing provides valuable insights about a lead’s experience and interaction, while sales create the middle and bottom of the funnel offer to address customer concerns. Finally, inbound marketing techniques are more measurable as you can easily calculate how many leads you need for each customer you want to earn.

As an endnote, taking care of your prospects and staying with them through the entire buyer’s journey through the attract-engage-deliver method should be a priority. If you are present online you already have the basics to start creating your inbound marketing strategy.

 

Although inbound is more cost-effective than traditional outbound marketing, it takes time and a lot of effort to understand your customers and engage with them. It’ll surely be worth it when you ensure that you are providing a valuable experience from the beginning until the end of the process.


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The Importance of Buyer Personas

Too often marketers and business owners forget that their targets are people, NOT numbers. But, you can’t expect to reach engaged customers without first identifying your Buyer Persona.

The concept of buyer personas is one of the most overlooked areas when it comes to a company’s marketing strategy. I can’t tell you how many times over the last 10 years of GoViral, I’ve asked a client who they are selling to, who their IDEAL buyer is, and they tell me something along the lines of “men and women between 18 and 65 in the UK interested in fitness.” As an inbound marketer, I NEED to know who I’m talking to in order to attract, convert and delight them. How do I talk to a “men and women between 18 and 65?” What basis do I have to understand their needs or their problems? 

One of the first things I learned in sales is that if you just tell someone all the great things you do, then you are just telling them features. If you first take the time to simply LISTEN and find out what their needs are and then match your offering to those needs, then you are describing benefits. People buy benefits, not features. Yet business owners are so quick to pass over that step and narrow down on a human, authentic ideal customer to target.

Their fear is that if I make them narrow down a specific persona to target, then they won’t be able to reach other audiences. But that’s not what happens. When I identify a buyer persona, I can create content that speaks to them. So yeah, the money spent on this targeting is going to give you the best return. But do you know what else it does? It also creates content, copy, images and voice that sounds authentic. Content that speaks in a helpful and caring way. Content that brings customers. 

Instead of being that person who enters a room and wants to tell everyone as loudly as possible how great they are to all the “men and women between 18 and 85,” be the person who’s done their research before they entered the party and take the time to listen and offer great advice to the people who would benefit the most. This will create a healthy buyer journey that gives you the most bang for your buck. Here’s how.

-Belinda Filippelli, Managing Director at GoViral Digital


Your buyer persona is a huge part of successful Inbound Marketing. Instead of wasting time and resources to market to the masses (outbound marketing), tailoring your content to attract potential buyers (inbound marketing) “looking” for your product or service can save you a lot of time, effort (and $$). Inbound marketing can be viewed as a cycle: attract, engage, delight. You attract potential customers and engage with them with interesting content, and then delight them by addressing their problems (usually through your product/service). But in order to engage with your audience in a way that will convert, you have to be sure you’re talking to the right people. This is your buyer persona.

What Is A Buyer Persona?

Buyer Personas are fictional representations of your ideal customers based on real data about demographics and online behavior. 

When creating your buyer persona(s), it’s important to go beyond the traditional demographics. You should include aspects such as behavior patterns, motivations, goals, and any other factors that would further clarify who your target is. The more detailed you are, the better.

A detailed buyer persona will help you determine where to focus your time. As a result, it will facilitate your ability to attract the most valuable visitors, leads, and customers to your business, and keep them brand loyal by ensuring you use the right voice.

It’s the difference between making a few one-time sales, and making a community of brand-loyal customers who will continue to convert.

Questions to Ask When Creating A Buyer Persona

To get started, think about the different facets of your buyer persona’s life: personal, professional, values and fears, goals and challenges, and use this to better understand how to speak and sell to your audience. Below are some good starter questions we use at GoViral.

After you’ve established the foundations of your buyer persona, you can even take it further to really get down to understanding what drives them by considering any objections they might have, and how you could convince them otherwise. 

Tying it Together

Once you’ve gotten this far, you’re ready to start putting the pieces together to make the story of your buyer persona! Here’s a brief example of one buyer persona (often, you will have multiple!) we came up with for an e-commerce client, The Clean Living Company, a health food and supplement company specialising in organic bone broth and collagen supplements.

Be Flexible

Once you’ve got your buyer persona down, don’t be afraid to change it. After you get things moving, you might realise an aspect of your buyer persona that you were way off on. Maybe you’ve seen some reservations you didn’t account for in your initial strategy? Maybe you have a totally different audience interested in your product or service that you didn’t initially account for? That’s great! Marketing is an ever-changing process, so it’s important to be flexible and willing to make updates and improvements as time goes on.


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Inbound vs Outbound Marketing

At GoViral, we’ve been practising and preaching inbound marketing for 10 whole years. You may or may not be familiar with this term, so we made sure to explain it to you. Inbound marketing is different from the traditional outbound marketing method. Do you know the difference? You can read more about it below and how it can improve your business.

What is outbound marketing?

Try to visualise that your phone rings and it’s a company trying to sell you a doghouse but you don’t even own a dog. You try to hang up but the person is still talking! Well, this is an example of outbound marketing. Outbound marketing examples include irrelevant billboards trying to sell you something, multiple emails advertising products that you don’t need and late-night telemarketing shows. This form of marketing tries to blast its message (product, service, etc) from within the company out to the world, hoping to attract potential customers. The company using outbound marketing showers everyone with these advertisements, but only a few customers will be relevant and make a purchase.

So why is this method outdated? Well, you are wasting time sending messages to people that aren’t interested. It is surprising that businesses still operate this way. They shoot their ads into the dark hoping to hit a target. Inbound marketing is different and more effective.

What is inbound marketing?

Inbound marketing attracts potential customers to you through engaging social media content. Customers become aware of your brand through your website, then show interest in your product and hopefully end up making a purchase. For any company, this might seem quite obvious to do, right? Try to imagine a magnet attracting customers from the outside to your brand. Content from a company using inbound marketing is made to get to people who might actually be interested based on the target buyer persona. Well, it hasn’t always been done this way. Outbound marketing was the go-to in the past, and many companies and brands are still doing it the old-fashioned way.

What are the main differences between inbound and outbound marketing?

Instead of wasting time and resources to market to the masses (outbound marketing), tailoring your content to attract potential buyers (inbound marketing) “looking” for your product or service can save you a lot of time, effort (and $$). Inbound marketing can be viewed as a cycle: attract, engage, delight. You attract potential customers and engage with them with interesting content, and then delight them by addressing their problems (usually through your product/service).

How can you use inbound marketing for your business?

Are you still using outbound marketing? Times are changing and seeing that inbound marketing is more effective, it could greatly benefit your marketing performance. We made some suggestions that can get you started in transforming your business by using inbound marketing techniques.

Attract

You can start by looking at the content you use across your social channels and website. Does this content add value to customers you want to attract? Posting about a sale might be valuable, but posting a guide on how to successfully use your product or service can be even better. Also, be sure to optimise your SEO by adding keywords to your content. Having relevant, interesting content with added value will help you to appear higher up in the search engines, therefore helping to drive organic traffic to your website.

Engage

When you finally get new leads from your valuable content, make sure to keep in mind that your goal is to build a long-term relationship. Try to sell solutions rather than just a product. Make sure those that are in contact with leads are building relationships and acting courteously. Think long-term rather than short. Which relationships do you want to have?

Delight

Let’s say that a lead changed to an actual customer. He or she followed your company’s social channels, got engaged and bought into it. What’s next? Keep the engagement going by acting as advisors to help your customers anytime. You can create surveys or chat boxes to keep the conversation going at any stage in the buying cycle. Also, listen to your social channels and react to your customers when they comment (or even complain about something). Reacting can help save a disappointed customer and it makes people feel like they matter (which they do if they’re you’re customers),

These are just a few tips to get you started in using inbound methods rather than outbound marketing. Do you want professional guidance? GoViral has now a whole decade of experience specialising in inbound marketing and we can help you improve your business. Contact us to learn more!